Keynote Speakers' Biographies

Adam Nash

Adam Nash

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Keith W. Hipel

PhD, DrHC, PEng, FRSC, FCAE, FIEEE, FAWRA, FINCOSE, FEIC
President, Academy of Science, Royal Society of Canada
Senior Fellow, Centre for International Governance Innovation
Coordinator, Conflict Analysis Group

 

Keith Whipel

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Fred Spier

Fred Spier

Fred Spier is Senior Lecturer in Big History at the University of Amsterdam. He has organized and taught the annual 'Big History Course' at the University of Amsterdam since 1994; the annual 'Big History Lecture Series' at Eindhoven University of Technology since 2003; and the 'Big History Course' at Amsterdam University College since 2009. As of August 2014 Spier is president of the International Big History Association (IBHA). Spier has performed research in a wide range of academic fields: the genetic manipulation of plants in the 1970s; religion, politics, and ecology in Peru in the 1980s and early 1990s; and structuring and explaining big history from 1993 until today. Over the past twenty years Spier has been developed a general paradigm for big history that is increasingly adopted by other big history scholars. Spier's trend-setting book, The Structure of Big History (1996) offered the first contours of this approach, while his ground-breaking article How Big History Works: Energy Flows and the Rise and Demise of Complexity (2005) presented the first general outline of his explanation of big history, which is valid for all scales of history. His Big History and the Future of Humanity, Wiley-Blackwell (2010), offers a much more detailed version of this argument, including an entire research agenda for big history. This book has received worldwide acclaim, and is now also in use as a textbook for university big history courses around the world. 

Peter Eckersall

Peter Eckersall

Peter Eckersall is Professor of Theatre and Performance at the City University of New York Graduate Centre (Theatre). He is a specialist of Japanese Theatre and dramaturgy and contemporary performance. He is currently co-chief investigator for an international research project titled New media dramaturgy: how new media transform the composition and reception of live performance (2012-14) that includes comparative perspectives on performance dramaturgy from Japan, Europe, the US, and Australia. Peter serves as the Vice President of Performance Studies international (PSi) and is the co-convenor of the PSi Dramaturgy and Performance Studies working group. He is co-founder and co-editor of Performance Paradigm and serves on editorial advisory boards for About Performance and Museum Tusculanum Press (In Between States series). He is a visiting fellow in the Centre for Interweaving Performance Cultures, Berlin. Peter is the cofounder of The Dramaturgies Project (with Paul Monaghan and Melanie Beddie), and the resident dramaturg for the Melbourne based contemporary performance group Not Yet It’s Difficult. Major publications include: Performativity and Event in 1960s Japan: City, Body, Memory (Palgrave 2013), Theatre and Performance in the Asia-Pacific: Regional Modernities in the Global Era (co-authored with Denise Varney, Barbara Hatley and Chris Hudson, Palgrave 2013), We’re People Who Do Shows: Back to Back Theatre: Performance, Politics, Visibility (co-edited with Helena Grehan, Performance Research Books, 2013), Kawamura Takeshi’s Nippon Wars and Other Plays (ed. and translation, Seagull Books 2011), Theorising the Angura Space: avant-garde performance and politics in Japan 1960-2000 (Brill Academic, 2006). His new monograph New Media Dramaturgy (co-authored with Helena Grehan and Edward Scheer) will be published by Palgrave in 2016. He has published in journals such as TDR, Theatre Research International, Japanese Studies and Australasian Drama Studies.